Search results for: Power query convert time zone

Below are our best 41 results for power query convert time zone, updated recently.

stackoverflow.com

My Report data has a Time Zone info which is stored as standard ID (like Pacific Standard Time) and I need to convert values in my DateTimeOffset column to the time zone I was talking about above, this is how I do that in C#: TimeSpan timeZoneOffsetSpan = TimeZoneInfo.FindSystemTimeZoneById (settings.TimeZ one).GetUtcOffset …

Convert Time Zones with Power Query

Have you ever gotten date information for different systems and the dates were different from your local time? I don't mean the format like it was mm/yy/dd ...

powerquery.io

Converts the timezone component to the local timezone. function (optional dateTimeZone as nullable any) as nullable any. Description. Changes timezone information of the datetimezone value dateTimeZone to the local timezone information. If dateTimeZone does not have a timezone component, the local timezone information is added.

powerquery.io

DateTimeZone.From. Creates a datetimezone from the given value. function (optional value as nullable any, optional culture as nullable any) as nullable any. Description. Returns a datetimezone value from the given value. If the given value is null, DateTimeZone.From returns null. If the given value is datetimezone, value is returned.

Changing Time Zones in Power Query

When you get date and time values from another systems, sometimes it is in a time zone that is different from yours. For example you might get a field that ...

pbiusergroup.com

If the first, then just add the timezone correction to your SQL Query using AT TIMEZONE, DATETIMEOFFSET, or similar. If the second, you can add a timezone correction via DAX calculated column or measure using date math.

pbiusergroup.com

From: Kirk Braukmann. Subject: Changing Time Zone w/ a Direct Query Connection. Looking for a way to change the time zone of a DateTimeZone field in Power Query on a Direct Query data source. I've tried the M time changing expressions but those do not support direct query. I tried a manual -6/-7 conversion but day light savings and users in ...

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Athena date functions

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You need to replace the string with the email address of the user you want to use. A Microsoft Query (aka MS Query, aka Excel Query) is in fact an SQL SELECT Statement. 4- End loop. The following example shows a single conditional flow named Convert-for-devices, configured in the ProxyEndpoint response flow. On the right side, give the value 18. g.

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02. For each table used in SQL query, insert a table script in input field. Types of Joins in Oracle An A/B test has gone live for a "Trending" sort option for answers. The data t

Solved: Convert utc to local time zone using Power Query ...

24-06-2016 · Convert utc to local time zone using Power Query ‎06-24-2016 12:41 PM Would i like to convert a column [CreatedOn] Table [Opportunity] found in (UTC + 00: 00) to (UTC + 03: 00) Brazil.

24-06-2016

I had the same problem. It's unfortunate that there's no proper native support for converting between timezones.

This is what i did for a quick and simple converstion of a UTC column to a new AEST column, taking DST into consideration:

  1. Open Query Editor
  2. Add a new column, and specify the m query below. The below will take the "Created" date in UTC, get the GMT offset based on the DST change-over dates in UTC for my region, and then pass that into DateTimeZone.SwitchZone to get the "Created" date in AEST.
  3. Set the data type to Date
// Convert "Created" date from UTC to AEST
let createdString = Number.ToText(Date.Year([Created]))
& Text.PadStart(Number.ToText(Date.Month([Created])), 2, "0")
& Text.PadStart(Number.ToText(Date.Day([Created])), 2, "0")
& Text.PadStart(Number.ToText(Time.Hour([Created])), 2, "0"),

createdNum = Number.FromText(createdString),

// AEST time: get the offset depending on whether it's daylight savings time or not (GMT 11 or GMT 10) by looking at the DST change-over times in GMT 0
timeZoneOffsetAEST = if createdNum >= 2017093016 and createdNum < 2018033117 
then "11" 
else 
	if createdNum >= 2018100616 and createdNum < 2019040617
	then "11" 
	else 
        if createdNum >= 2019100516 and createdNum < 2020040417 
	    then "11" 
	    else 
            if createdNum >= 2020100316 and createdNum < 2021040317 
	        then "11" 
	        else "10",

createdInAEST = DateTimeZone.SwitchZone(DateTimeZone.From([Created]),Number.FromText(timeZoneOffsetAEST),0)

in createdInAEST

There are better solutions where people are importing a table of GMT offsets from excel spreadsheets, or by querying a web service, since powerBI is able to query web. I just needed a quick and simple solution that would work well enough for the next few years, so i just hard coded the DST times (GMT 11) times for the next few years to get the right GMT offset.

DateTimeZone functions - PowerQuery M

DateTimeZone. Function. Description. DateTimeZone.FixedLocalNow. Returns a DateTimeZone value set to the current date, time, and timezone offset on the system. DateTimeZone.FixedUtcNow. Returns the current date and time in UTC (the GMT timezone). DateTimeZone.From. Returns a datetimezone value from a value.

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These functions create and manipulate datetimezone values.

DateTimeZone

How-To: Convert UTC to Your Local Time Zone in Pow ...

16-03-2020 · Chris Webb wrote an article about DST in Power Query where he says: “Frustratingly there doesn’t seem to be a way to convert a UTC time to the correct local time in any given time zone in M – the DateTimeZone.SwitchZone() function just adds/removes hours without taking Daylight Saving Time into account, so it’s not really very useful.”

16-03-2020

Is there a simple way to convert a timestamp in UTC to your local time zone in Power Query? Yes and no. Let’s find out what the options are.

TLDR section

https://github.com/nolockcz/PowerQuery/tree/master/UTC to Local Time However, I personally recommend reading the article once before you use it in your project.

Research

I have started with research on the internet. Maybe there is a solution I can use without spending time on writing my own code. Let’s list some of them – I do not want to call them solutions, a finding is a better word, I think.

Finding No. 1

On forums, you can find a recommendation for using the function DateTime.AddZone. Well, this function just adds an offset to a datetime value. If you live in a country without daylight saving time (DST), it can be your choice.

An example which shifts the datetime by 01:00: DateTime.AddZone(#datetime(2020, 3, 9, 10, 11, 12), 1, 0). The result is of data type datetimezone.

Finding No. 2

Or another recommendation is using a duration like #datetime(2020, 3, 9, 10, 11, 12) #duration(0, 1, 0, 0) which does almost the same as the previous example. The result is of the data type datetime.

Finding No. 3

The most original solution in my opinion is this one ( source )

// Convert "Created" date from UTC to AEST
let createdString = Number.ToText(Date.Year([Created]))
& Text.PadStart(Number.ToText(Date.Month([Created])), 2, "0")
& Text.PadStart(Number.ToText(Date.Day([Created])), 2, "0")
& Text.PadStart(Number.ToText(Time.Hour([Created])), 2, "0"),

createdNum = Number.FromText(createdString),

// AEST time: get the offset depending on whether it's daylight savings time or not (GMT 11 or GMT 10) by looking at the DST change-over times in GMT 0
timeZoneOffsetAEST = if createdNum >= 2017093016 and createdNum < 2018033117 
then "11" 
else 
	if createdNum >= 2018100616 and createdNum < 2019040617
	then "11" 
	else 
        if createdNum >= 2019100516 and createdNum < 2020040417 
	    then "11" 
	    else 
            if createdNum >= 2020100316 and createdNum < 2021040317 
	        then "11" 
	        else "10",

createdInAEST = DateTimeZone.SwitchZone(DateTimeZone.From([Created]),Number.FromText(timeZoneOffsetAEST),0)

in createdInAEST

It is a time bomb! It works for timestamps between March 2017 and September 2021 in Australia. Before and after that the conversion will be wrong! But there is at least an elementary support for DST :smiling_face_with_smiling_eyes:

Finding No. 4

There is another M function, which you can use for the conversion: DateTimeZone.ToLocal. It works in Power BI Desktop because it takes the offset of the time zone from your operating system. But what happens in Power BI Service? The Azure cloud runs using UTC only. It means, a UTC timestamp stays unchanged if you refresh your data in the cloud.

Finding No. 5

Chris Webb wrote an article about DST in Power Query where he says: “Frustratingly there doesn’t seem to be a way to convert a UTC time to the correct local time in any given time zone in M – the DateTimeZone.SwitchZone() function just adds/removes hours without taking Daylight Saving Time into account, so it’s not really very useful.”

A solution

If the good uncle Google does not help, I have to write my own solution. It handles DST and it should work in all countries where the switch between standard and daylight saving time is regular. If you want to know more about different rules around the globe, visit http://www.webexhibits.org/daylightsaving/g.html or https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daylight_saving_time_by_country or another similar website.

The function, I have written, has one parameter of the type any – I want to have just one function which accepts a datetime or a datetimezone timestamp. Later in the function body there is a check if it is one of these datatypes.

(UTCTimestamp as any) as nullable datetime =>

At the beginning, there is a record which defines what your offset during standard and DST is. You should change these offsets if you do not live in 01:00 / 02:00 DST. The record contains also a function called fnDaylightSavingTimePeriod, which calculates the start and the end of DST in your time zone. I have implemented the logic used in the European Union (last Sunday of March, last Sunday of October). If you have another rule set than mine, you have to modify this function too. (Why so complicated with the record? I usually have a record containing a global configuration for a dataset. And the offsets and the function fnDaylightSavingTime are a part of it.)

/*
 * The record defines when the daylight saving time period starts and ends
 * and what the standard and daylight saving time offsets are.
 */
TimeZoneConfiguration = [
    // standard offset
    StandardOffset = #duration(0, 1, 0, 0),            
    // the day light saving time offset
    DaylightSavingTimeOffset = #duration(0, 2, 0, 0),

    /* 
    * Get start and end of daylight saving time.
    * This code implements the rules of EU counties. If it doesn't fill your expectations, 
    * go to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daylight_saving_time_by_country and modify the code below.
    */
    fnDaylightSavingTimePeriod = (
        timestamp as datetime
    ) as record => 
        let
            // the daylight saving time starts on the last Sunday of March at 1am UTC
            LastDayOfMarch = #date(Date.Year(timestamp), 3, 31),
            StartOfDaylightSavingTime = Date.AddDays(LastDayOfMarch, -Date.DayOfWeek(LastDayOfMarch, Day.Sunday)) & #time(1, 0, 0),
            
            // the daylight saving time ends on the last Sunday of October at 1am UTC
            LastDayOfOctober = #date(Date.Year(timestamp), 10, 31),
            EndOfDaylightSavingTime = Date.AddDays(LastDayOfOctober, -Date.DayOfWeek(LastDayOfOctober, Day.Sunday)) & #time(1, 0, 0),
            
            Result = 
                [
                    From = StartOfDaylightSavingTime, 
                    To = EndOfDaylightSavingTime
                ]
        in
            Result
],

The rest of the code is very simple. It checks if your timestamp is in the standard or DST period and add the offset to the timestamp.

// convert UTC to local time defined by an offset
LocalTime = 
    if DateTimeUTC = null then
        null
    else if DateTimeUTC >= DaylightSavingTimePeriod[From] and DateTimeUTC < DaylightSavingTimePeriod[To] then
        DateTimeUTC   TimeZoneConfiguration[DaylightSavingTimeOffset]
    else
        DateTimeUTC   TimeZoneConfiguration[StandardOffset]

And the whole function:

(UTCTimestamp as any) as nullable datetime =>
    let 
        /*
        * The record defines when the daylight saving time period starts and ends
        * and what the standard and daylight saving time offsets are.
        */
        TimeZoneConfiguration = [
            // standard offset
            StandardOffset = #duration(0, 1, 0, 0),            
            // the day light saving time offset
            DaylightSavingTimeOffset = #duration(0, 2, 0, 0),

            /* 
            * Get start and end of daylight saving time.
            * This code implements the rules of EU counties. If it doesn't fill your expectations, 
            * go to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daylight_saving_time_by_country and modify the code below.
            */
            fnDaylightSavingTimePeriod = (
                timestamp as datetime
            ) as record => 
                let
                    // the daylight saving time starts on the last Sunday of March at 1am UTC
                    LastDayOfMarch = #date(Date.Year(timestamp), 3, 31),
                    StartOfDaylightSavingTime = Date.AddDays(LastDayOfMarch, -Date.DayOfWeek(LastDayOfMarch, Day.Sunday)) & #time(1, 0, 0),
                    
                    // the daylight saving time ends on the last Sunday of October at 1am UTC
                    LastDayOfOctober = #date(Date.Year(timestamp), 10, 31),
                    EndOfDaylightSavingTime = Date.AddDays(LastDayOfOctober, -Date.DayOfWeek(LastDayOfOctober, Day.Sunday)) & #time(1, 0, 0),
                    
                    Result = 
                        [
                            From = StartOfDaylightSavingTime, 
                            To = EndOfDaylightSavingTime
                        ]
                in
                    Result
        ],

        DateTimeUTC = 
            if Value.Is(UTCTimestamp, type nullable datetime) then
                UTCTimestamp
            else if Value.Is(UTCTimestamp, type nullable datetimezone) then
                DateTimeZone.RemoveZone(UTCTimestamp)
            else
                error Error.Record(
                    "Invalid data type of parameter UTCTimestamp",
                    null,
                    "Allowed data types are 'datetime' and 'datetimezone'."
                ),

        // get daylight saving time period
        DaylightSavingTimePeriod = TimeZoneConfiguration[fnDaylightSavingTimePeriod](DateTimeUTC),

        // convert UTC to local time defined by an offset
        LocalTime = 
            if DateTimeUTC = null then
                null
            else if DateTimeUTC >= DaylightSavingTimePeriod[From] and DateTimeUTC < DaylightSavingTimePeriod[To] then
                DateTimeUTC   TimeZoneConfiguration[DaylightSavingTimeOffset]
            else
                DateTimeUTC   TimeZoneConfiguration[StandardOffset]
    in
        LocalTime

Next steps

If you think, there is a rule in your country which you are unable to write in M, let me know down in the comments. I will do my best to help you.

thepoweruser.com

Recommended way to convert time zones in Power BI / Power Query. This one requires you to use a specific function, but it’s quite a simple function called DateTimeZone.SwitchZone which, in comparison to the DateTimeZone.ToLocal, only adds a second argument where you can input (as a number) the correct time zone to which you want …

docs.microsoft.com

In this article Syntax DateTimeZone.SwitchZone(dateTimeZone as nullable datetimezone, timezoneHours as number, optional timezoneMinutes as nullable number) as nullable datetimezone About. Changes timezone information to on the datetimezone value dateTimeZone to the new timezone information provided by timezoneHours and optionally …

Converting time zone in Microsoft Power Automate

Converts a string timestamp passed in from a source time zone to a target time zone. You will need to pass in the following: timestamp: The datetime you wish to convert. sourceTimeZone: The time zone the datetime is currently in. destinationTimeZone: The time zone you want to convert your date to.

Power Automate More...Less

When you are passing datetimes through triggers and actions in Microsoft Power Automate, users may find a datetime in the wrong time zone. Users may wish to convert the time zone (frequently in UTC) to their local time.

This is due to services passing dates through in varying formats or time zones. Each connector may use a different datetime format or time zone.

Some services use strictly UTC time to avoid confusion. 

There are two ways to solve this - via an action or an expression. 

Power Automate has a built-in operation called "Convert time zone".

Search for "convert time zone" and choose the "Convert time zone" operation.

Convert time zone action search in Power Automate

The "Convert time zone" operation has a few required inputs: 

Convert time zone action in Power Automate

Base time: The datetime you wish to convert.
Source time zone: The time zone that the datetime is currently in. 
Destination time zone: The time zone you want to convert your date to. 

See the "Notes" below for ways to find the current time zone.

Power Automate has an expression function for converting time zone.

Convert time zone expression in Power Automate

convertTimeZone(timestamp: string, sourceTimeZone: string, destinationTimeZone: string, format?: string) Required. A string that contains the time.

Converts a string timestamp passed in from a source time zone to a target time zone

You will need to pass in the following: 

timestamp: The datetime you wish to convert. 
sourceTimeZone: The time zone the datetime is currently in.
destinationTimeZone: The time zone you want to convert your date to.
format (optional): The format of the time zone you wish to convert your date to. 

For example: 

convertTimeZone(triggerBody()?['Date'],'UTC','Eastern Standard Time','HH:mm')

Here, timestamp is "triggerBody()?['Date']", the source time zone is "UTC", the destination time zone is "Eastern Standard Time", and the format is "HH:mm".

Please see the convertTimeZone documentation for more information about this expression function.

Datetimes may come in different formats.

If your datetime has a "Z" at the end, it means it is in UTC time. For example: 2020-04-10T01:28:14.0406387Z

Please see Standard date and time format strings for more information about datetime formats.

You may get errors where your date time string is not in the correct format, ex. "The date time string must match ISO8601 format". Please see the formatDateTime expression documentation on how to correctly format your datetime string.

If you are unsure what the datetime time zone is currently in, you can run your flow to take a look out the datetime output format. 

In this example, the "Get forecast for today" operation outputs the timestamp for when we got the forecast. 

Convert time zone example in Power Automate

This datetime is using the ISO-8601 datetime format. We can see that this operation outputs the datetime in the UTC timezone.

There may be limitations in some connectors on how the time zone is displayed. Please see the connectors reference documentation for more details on each connector.

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Dynamic time zone conversion using Power BI

We will next create two calculated measures – Current time (UTC) and Current time (Local). Current Time (UTC) = UTCNOW () Current Time (Local) = UTCNOW () + [Current Offset] Now we can add a slicer to our report page, and use the “Zone ” dimension. Next, we add two card slicers, one displaying the current time in the UTC time zone, and ...

Have you ever wanted to show your time data in different time zones simultaneously? Or allows users of the same report to display time values in their own time zone? This article outlines one approach for doing so.

If you’ve spent much time building reports for users in more than one time zone, you’ve likely come across a few of the idiosyncrasies of Power BI and date/time values. In fact, if you’ve worked with time zone values in Power Query and you don’t happen to live in the UK) , you’ve likely noticed that your reports show different time based values when they get published to the service. This is because the Power BI service operates in the UTC time zone, and evaluates all locale based time functions in that time zone. Power BI Desktop evaluates them according to the locale of the user.

For that reason, UTC date/time values are paramount. Luckily, most source data is available in UTC format, and it’s up to report designers to convert it as necessary. However, what happens when a single report is meant to serve users in different time zones? Alternatively, what if you want to use a single data model to serve reports in different time zones?

Time calculations can be performed both in Power Query, and in DAX. However, if we want our users to be able to to select their time zone from filters or slicers, we’re going to be restricted to using DAX. We’re also going to need a good source of time zone data. In the end, we need the time offset from UTC so that our time calculations can adjust time accordingly.

One good source of time zone offset is the Time Zone Database. You can register for an API key (its free), and call it directly using Power BI’s web connector. This means that when we refresh our data, we will get up to date offset data when daylight saving time changes, or there are local changes to the time zone rules.

To retrieve the time zone data, connect to it using Get Data in Power BI Desktop, then select the Web connector. If prompted, choose “Anonymous” as the authentication type, and enter the following for the url:

http://api.timezonedb.com/v2.1/list-time-zone?key=XXXXXXXX&format=json 

Where key is the API key that you received when registering at the Time Zone Database.

As of October 2020, Power Query will then convert the resultant JSON data into a simple table. Some of the columns are unnecessary, and we can safely remove status, message, and timestamp. I like to rename the columns into something a little more user friendly. The offset value returned in in seconds. DAX does its date calculations in days, so I create another column with the same value converted to days (the listed value divided by 86,400). It’s also a good idea to rename the query. When complete, your table should look something like below.

At this point, we can select Close and Apply to load the data into the model.

Our report will show the current time for any selected time zone. We therefore need to know which time zone is selected. We will assume that a filter or slicer, or a row filter has been applied, and there is only one currently selected value. We need to use an aggregate function in order to return the offset value, so in this case, we will MAX. We can therefore create a calculated measure to hold the selected offset value:

Current Offset = MAX('Time Zones'[Offset (days)])

Next, we need the current time. DAX has a Now() function that will return this value, but it will be returned in the locale of the user. When it runs on the service, it will return UTC time. We want this to work properly everywhere, so instead of Now() we will use UTCNow() which always returns the current time in UTC. We will next create two calculated measures – Current time (UTC) and Current time (Local).

Current Time (UTC) = UTCNOW()
Current Time (Local) = UTCNOW() + [Current Offset]

Now we can add a slicer to our report page, and use the “Zone ” dimension. Next, we add two card slicers, one displaying the current time in the UTC time zone, and the other will display the current time in the zone selected in the slicer. It’s a good idea to use the slicer’s selection control to “Single select” to prevent multiple zones from being selected. Every slicer selection will update the two “clocks” and the local time should reflect the currently selected time zone.

To see row filters in action, simply open a new page, and add a table that displays the Zone name (and any other relevant dimensions) along with the Current time (Local).

Given that the fact that slicer selections and filter values can be selected by users and persisted, this allows a single report to be used my multiple users in different time zones, but these users can see the data in their own local time zone right in the Power BI service.

powerusers.microsoft.com

To convert your UTC datetime to the local time zone use this code in the Text property of your label. DateAdd(CREATED_DATE, TimeZoneOffset(CREATED_DATE), Minutes) ---. Please click "Accept as Solution" if my post answered your question so that others may find it more quickly.

bielite.com

0:00. 0:00. 0:00 / 6:01 •. Live. •. Download the following Power BI file as a template to start converting time zones directly in Power BI. The timezone conversion is powered by Impktful and is free for everyone!

powerusers.microsoft.com

Go to Solution. 06-15-2020 06:26 AM. Ideally I will convert utcNow () first to my local timezone first and then use it in formulae to add days and formatting. 06-12-2020 02:31 PM. Please use "Convert time zone" action to convert source time zone to destination in required format of your choice. 06-14-2020 09:41 AM.

Using PowerQuer to Control Data From Different ...

20-05-2015 · Comparing data from different timezones isn't as straight forward in Power Query as you'd hope. Here's one way of doing exactly that.

20-05-2015

A friend of mine emailed yesterday asking how to compare data from different time zones.  With how good the UI is in Power Query, you’d think this would be easy.  Unfortunately it’s a bit less than that, so I thought it would make a good example for today’s post.

Background

Let’s assume that we’ve got two columns of data; an Order Date and a Shipping Date.  We’d like to work out the number of days it took to ship our order.  Easy enough, we just need to subtract one from the other… except… the system that holds the Order Date reports it in UTC 0:00, and the shipping date is done from my home time zone (UTC –7:00).

The data table we’re starting with looks like this:

image

And you can download a copy of the workbook from my OneDrive here if you’d like to follow along.

Avoiding Temptation

So the first thing to do is pull the data in to Power Query.  So I clicked in the table, went to the Power Query tab, and chose From Table.  At this point we’re greeted with a nice table, and our first temptation is to go directly to the Transform tab and set the Data Type to Date/Time/Timezone:

image

And herein lies a problem.  The system has forced my local TimeZone on the data.  As specified in the initial problem, I need this to carry a UTC 0:00 distinction.

It’s a shame that there is no intermediate step here (how often do I ask for MORE clicks?) which allowed you to specify WHICH TimeZone.  If you’re into working with data from different regions (I.e. this feature), I’d don’t think I’m venturing out on a limb to say that this is pretty important.

To further complicate things, that is the extent of the TimeZone functionality in the UI.  And that’s not going to help us.  So let’s knock off the “Changed Type” step and look at this another way.

Using M to Deal with Data From Different TimeZones

The secret to making this work is to take explicit control of the time zone settings using some Power Query M functions.  It’s not as hard as it sounds.  In fact, we’re only going to use two in this example:

  • DateTime.AddZone to add a time zone to a DateTime data type
  • DateTimeZone.SwitchZone to convert from one time zone to another

I discovered both of these functions by searching the Power Query formula categories article on Microsoft’s site.

Forcing a DateTime to a Specific Time Zone

So we’re currently looking at this data in Power Query:

image

Let’s create a new column to convert the OrderDate:

  • Add Column –> Add Custom Column
    • Name:  Order Date (UTC 0:00)
    • Formula:  =DateTime.AddZone([OrderDate],0)

The secret here is in the last parameter, as we get to specify the time zone.  Since we know these dates/times come out of our system in UTC 0:00, we’re good to not add anything to it.  The result is shown below:

image

Converting a DateTime to a Different Time Zone

Now, in order to be able to compare our DateTimes easily, we want them both to be based in our own time zone.  Since my business works in UTC –7:00, I really want my Order Date represented in that time zone as well.  So let’s convert it.

  • Add Column –> Add Custom Column
    • Name:  Order Date (UTC -7:00)
    • Formula:  =DateTimeZone.SwitchZone([#"OrderDate (UTC 0:00)"],-7)

SNAGHTML1f066319

Beautiful.

Just a note here… It may have been tempting to force this data to UTC –7:00 when we added the time zone above, but that would have assigned the date based in the wrong time zone.  I.e. our first record would have returned 7/4/1996 1:12:00 PM –07:00, which is not the same as what we ended up with.

Forcing another DateTime to a Different Time Zone

Now we need to deal with the ShippedDate column, forcing that to my local time.  I could just select the column and turn it into a Date/Time/Timezone data type, but I won’t.  Why?  What if I send this workbook to another user?  It will return THEIR time zone, not mine.  And that could be different.  Much better to explicitly set it.

  • Add Column –> Add Custom Column
    • Name:  ShippedDate (UTC –7:00)
    • Formula:  DateTime.AddZone([ShippedDate],-7)

Notice that this time we do force it to be in the –7 time zone, as these DateTimes originated from that time zone. The result:

SNAGHTML1f0e9e46

Fantastic.  We’ve added time zone data, without changing the original times.

Let’s just go do a little bit of cleanup now:

  • Select the OrderDate and ShippedDate columns
  • Transform –> Data Type –> Date/Time
  • Select OrderDate (UTC 0:00) through ShippedDate (UTC –7:00)
  • Transform –> Date Type –> Date/Time/Timezone

Excellent.  Now they should show up correctly when we load them to an Excel table instead of losing their formatting.

Making Comparisons

We’re at the final step now: Working out the time to ship.  This is relatively straight forward:

  • Add Column –> Add Custom Column
    • Name:  Days to Ship
    • Formula:  [#"ShippedDate (UTC -7:00)"]-[#"OrderDate (UTC -7:00)"]
  • Select the Days to Ship column
  • Transform –> Data Type –> Duration

Note:  You can just double click the column names in the formula wizard and it will put the # characters in there for you.

And the final look in Power Query:

SNAGHTML1f1602fa

With that all complete, the final step is to give the query a name (I chose ShippingTimes) and load it to a worksheet:

image

Final Thoughts

Personally, I like to take explicit control over my data types.  Call me a control freak if you like (I’ve been called much worse) but relying on implicit conversions that set to “local time” scare me a bit, particularly if I’m going to be sending my workbook off to someone who lives in a different zone than I do.  Once you know how to do this it’s not super difficult, and I now know EXACTLY how it will represent on their side.

I’ll admit also that I’m a bit disappointed in the UI for datetime conversions.  To me, anyone playing in this field needs very granular control over every column.  An extra step in the Transform to Date/Time/Timzone step would go a long way to solving this, as you’d be able to skip writing custom formulas.  Hopefully that’s on the Power Query team’s radar for the future, as well as a full datetime menu that would allow us to easily choose from/add/convert to the majority of the formulas found in the article referenced above.

Power Query Training

Also don't forget.  If you love Power Query or are intrigued by the things you can do with it, we have an online training course coming up soon.  Check it out and register at www.powerquery.training/course

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Date time converter

3cloudsolutions.com

The first thing I do in Power Query is to identify the start and end date of Daylight Savings Time. In the US, the start date is the second Sunday in March and end date was the first Sunday in November and I’ve added the time of 2:00am. You could look these up and make a list of them for the next 8 or 10 years but to do it formulaically, I ...

Convert UTC to Local Time in Power BI

20-12-2017 · The Problem: Need to Convert UTC. We built an online event management and ticketing system for one of our clients. Events are scheduled and published. Customers purchase tickets online or from agents at the event sites. The date and time of each event are recorded in UTC. Also, the date and time that purchases are made for each event are ...

20-12-2017

Update: Recent updates to the Power BI service need to be reviewed and appropriate updates to the post will be made.

Power BI provides exceptional business analytic services. Additionally, the Power BI component Power Query provides a powerful and dynamic tool for loading and transforming data into Power BI’s data model. However, Power Query lacks a good way to convert a Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) to a local time of your choosing while preserving Daylight Savings Time (DST). Time zone functions do exist. However, one has to be careful how and where they are used. Below I explain the problem with Power Query’s ToLocal() function in the Power BI Service in more detail. I also provide my solution for converting UTC to the Pacific Time Zone.

The Problem: Need to Convert UTC

We built an online event management and ticketing system for one of our clients. Events are scheduled and published. Customers purchase tickets online or from agents at the event sites. The date and time of each event are recorded in UTC. Also, the date and time that purchases are made for each event are recorded in UTC.

The client’s accounting team needs to report on and analyze ticket purchases. The accountants are in US Pacific Time (PT), and all events are held in Pacific Time, so it makes sense to convert UTC to PT. This would be an easy modification except for the time change that takes place twice a year in most of the US and various parts of the world, called Daylight Savings Time (DST).  Under DST, clocks are adjusted ahead one hour in the spring and one hour back in the fall. These clock changes are also known as “Spring forward” and “Fall back.”

A simple PowerQuery expression can transform Coordinated Universal Time to any local time:

DateTimeZone.RemoveZone(
  DateTimeZone.ToLocal(
    DateTime.AddZone([EventStartDateTime], 0)
  )
)

This expression works great as long as users are in Power BI Desktop in Pacific Time. However, as soon as the model is published to the Power BI Service and the data refreshes, the date-times are no longer Pacific Time. ToLocal() converts to the local time of the Power BI servers, which are set for Universal Coordinated Time.

The Solution

To resolve the Daylight Savings Time issue, we need to determine if a date is in DST or not before adding an hour offset. My solution does this with a table of DST periods, including UTC. I created a PowerQuery function to look up a UTC-based value and return 1 if the value occurs in DST and 0 if it does not. I then add that value to the timezone offset.

My table of Daylight Savings Times:

Table of US Daylight Savings Times

The Power Query function:

let
  Source = (DateToCheck) => let
    CountOfRows = if DateToCheck is null
      then 0
    else let Source = DaylightSavings,
      DateToCheckDate = DateTime.From(DateToCheck),
      StartDates = Table.SelectRows(Source, each [DSTStartDateInUTC] <= DateToCheckDate),   EndDates = Table.SelectRows(StartDates, each [DstEndDateInUTC] > DateToCheckDate),
      CountOfRows = Table.RowCount(EndDates)
    in
      CountOfRows
  in
    CountOfRows
in
  Source

The function selects rows from the table where the UTC DateToCheck parameter provided is between a DST Start Date and DST End Date. If the table is configured correctly, at most one row will be returned when a date is in a DST period, and no rows will be returned when the DateToCheck is not within a DST start and end date range.

Note that the date time function parameter, DateToCheck, does not have a type declaration making it of type any. In Power Query, the any type can be null while DateTime is not nullable. As some of the source date-time values are null the any type for the parameter is required.

The value of the function is then used when offsetting UTC to local time. If the original date time is in a DST range, an additional hour will be added to the offset.

The next function makes it easy to adjust our Pacific Time conversion to consider Daylight Savings Time. Our custom column formula now looks like this:

  DateTimeZone.RemoveZone(
    DateTimeZone.SwitchZone(
      DateTime.AddZone([CreationDate], 0),
      -8 + CheckDaylightSavings([CreationDate])
    )
  )

DateTimeZone.SwitchZone() replaces ToLocal(). We pass in -8 hours which is the standard offset of US Pacific Time from UTC. We then call the custom function CheckDaylightSavings() which will move the time one hour forward if the passed in date time is in DST.

Summary

This seems like a lot of work to adjust for Daylight Savings Time, but it is the simplest and most straightforward way I could come up with. This isn’t a perfect solution by any means. Here are some drawbacks:

  • Only daylight savings times for which there is an entry in the Daylight Savings Time table are considered
  • This approach only converts to Pacific Times. Other time zones could easily be supported, but additional work is required to handle a time zone more dynamically if some users are in a different time zone and would like their reports localized.

There are other approaches I’ve seen from implementing an Azure Function to calling a DateTime web service as well as a fairly in depth function with extensive parameterization.

Have a Question?

If you’d like my code, have other approaches, or questions or feedback on this approach, please post a comment.

domiciliotrieste.it

1 hour ago · So just be aware that you cannot use format_datetime and then compare that value to a UTC value without then converting it back to a datetime. If you want a date string in a particular format, you can use the built-in string formatting. Jan 22, 2015 · PS C:> Use-Culture de-DE {get-date -Format d} 21.

Power Query; Convert Time Stamp to Date Time

31-05-2016 · Power Query Convert Timestamp to Date Time. Once we know what is definition of timestamp, and how to calculate date/time from it; easily we can use #duration (0,0,0,<timestamp value>) to show duration in seconds, and add it to the #datetime (1970,1,1,0,0,0) which is date time 1970-01-01 00:00:00. above query will respond 11/11/2014 9:12:45 AM.

31-05-2016

2016-05-31_23h02_33

Power Query has number of Date and Time functions that convert values to date and time. However I haven’t found a function that converts a timestamp value. Fortunately it is easy to calculate a date time from a timestamp value. In this post I’ll explain an easy way of converting timestamp to date time. To Learn more about Power Query read Power BI online book; from Rookie to Rock Star.

Timestamp is a whole number value, which is number of seconds from date 1970-01-01 00:00:00. For example; timestamp 100 means 1970-01-01 00:01:40, or timestamp 86400 means 1970-01-02 00:00:00. So the calculation is easy; We have to add timestamp as seconds to the date/time 1970-01-01 00:00:00.

Once we know what is definition of timestamp, and how to calculate date/time from it; easily we can use #duration(0,0,0,) to show duration in seconds, and add it to the #datetime(1970,1,1,0,0,0) which is date time 1970-01-01 00:00:00.

So as a result, here is the code to convert timestamp to date time;

DateTimedValue=#datetime(1970,1,1,0,0,0) #duration(0,0,0,1415697165)

above query will respond  11/11/2014 9:12:45 AM.

Please note that you have to replace the 1415697165 number with the field name containing timestamp values, or with your static timestamp value in the query.

Save

Save

Convert Time Zones in Power BI using DAX

28-10-2017 · Convert Time Zones in Power BI using DAX. Even if your SharePoint site’s regional settings are correct (or whichever data source you’re pulling from), Power BI could convert it to the wrong time zone upon import. It’s a quick fix, luckily. Instead of using your “modified,” “created” or other date field in your report, we’ll ...

28-10-2017

timezonecorrection.png

Even if your SharePoint site’s regional settings are correct (or whichever data source you’re pulling from), Power BI could convert it to the wrong time zone upon import. It’s a quick fix, luckily. Instead of using your “modified,” “created” or other date field in your report, we’ll create a new calculated column in Power BI to use with an accurate time zone.

  1. In the Data tab of Power BI, create a new column in your data source (not a new measure)
    newcolumn
  2. Enter the following equation, replacing red text with your unique data:NewColumnName = FORMAT(DataTableName[ColumnName] – TIME(5,0,0), “General Date”)For example:
    LocalTime = FORMAT(Tweets[Created]-TIME(7,0,0),”General Date”)
  3. Then, under the modeling tab in the formatting section, you can format the calculated column to display data in any number of ways. This is how data will show up for tooltips and perhaps the report itself depending on how you’ve set it up.
    dateformats
  4. Update your report to use this new column in place of your original date/time column.

Solving DAX Time Zone Issue in Power BI

23-08-2017 · Power BI is a cloud service, and that means Power BI files are hosted somewhere. Some DAX functions such as Date/Time functions work on system date/time on the server their file is hosted on. So If…

23-08-2017

2016-05-16_21h08_11

Power BI is a cloud service, and that means Power BI files are hosted somewhere. Some DAX functions such as Date/Time functions work on system date/time on the server their file is hosted on. So If you use DAX functions such as TODAY() or NOW() you will not get your local date/time, You will fetch server’s date/time. In this blog post I’ll explain methods of solving this issue, so you could use Power BI to resolve your specific time zone’s date and time. If you want to learn more about Power BI read Power BI online book; Power BI from Rookie to Rock Star.

Defining the Problem

Using DAX functions on your local Power BI file is totally different from what you will see in Power BI website especially when date and time functions has been used. The reason is that DAX works with the date and time of the system that hosted the Power BI file. Power BI is a could based service, and that means Power BI files will be hosted on a server somewhere in the world, that might not be on the same time zone as your city is. So as a result when you used functions that works with the current date and time; such as TODAY() or NOW() in DAX you will not get your local current date and time. At this stage there is time zone feature in DAX functions to help resolving this, so I suggest few options to resolve it as below.

Screenshot below shows a Power BI report published on Power BI website, and the result of DAX NOW() function there compared with the local date/time on the client system. Please note that you won’t see this anomaly in Power BI Desktop, because in that case file is running on your local system, and the result would be your local date/time, you will only face this issue when you publish solution to Power BI website.

2016-05-16_20h58_49

Method 1 – DAX Formula Manipulation

One easy way of solving this is to add time offset to the date/time function in DAX. Power BI date/time seems to be GMT. So if I want to show my local time in Auckland, I have to add 12 hours to it. Or for Seattle I have to reduce 7 hours from it.

So I create a new calculation as DAX NZ TIME with this code:

DAX NZ TIME = NOW() (12/24)

and another for DAX Seattle Time with this code:

DAX Seattle TIME = NOW()-(7/24)

Here is corrected result as below;

2016-05-16_21h08_11

This method works but has an issue which I deal with it later on.

Method 2 – Power Query DateTimeZone Functions

Thanks to my friend Ken Puls who mentioned this method to me in PASS BA conference, I come with this second option. Fortunately in Power Query there is set of functions for DateTimeZone. Ken already has a blog post about time zones with Power Query which is a good read and recommended. DateTimeZone functions has options such as fetching local time or switching time zones. For this purpose I can use DateTimeZone.SwitchZone function to switch server’s local time to my time zone’s date and time.

= DateTimeZone.SwitchZone(DateTimeZone.LocalNow(),12,0)

12 is hours, and 0 is minutes for the new time zone. script above will turn the local time zone to NZ time. for turning that into Seattle time I have to set parameters to -7, and 0.

And here is the result set:

2016-05-16_21h49_59

You can also use other functions such as DateTime.AddZone in Power Query to turn the local date time to specific time zone.

Well above solution works like DAX method, but both suffer from similar issue; Day Light Saving Time. This is the reason that if you try code above in summer or winter you might get different result!

Method 3 – Web Query with Power Query

Day Light Saving is a big challenge, because each time zone, city, or country might have different day light saving time. even same city might have different dates for DST (Daylight Saving Time) for different years! Power Query is intelligence enough to help with Time Zone issue, but doesn’t have a directory of all DST times for all time zones. Fortunately Power Query can query web URL. And there are some websites that give you the current date and time for your specific city, country, or time zone. And those websites usually consider DST correctly. One of these websites is TimeAndDate.com . As you see in screenshot below this website gives me the current date and time for most of cities around the world;

2016-05-16_23h16_50

In Power Query we can use functions such as Web.Page() and Web.Contents() to read tables in a web page, and then fetch part of it that we want with some other transformations. I won’t be explaining details of using timeanddate.com URL to fetch the local city here because it would make this post very long. I just refer you to my other post about reading some date/time information for different time zones which is similar to method I’ve used here. If you want to understand how code below works read the post here. For this part I will be using another website which gives me current date and time in Auckland, and here is Power Query code:

let
    Source = Web.Page(Web.Contents("http://localtimes.info/Oceania/New_Zealand/Auckland/")),
    Data1 = Source[Data],
    #"Changed Type" = Table.TransformColumnTypes(Data1,{{"Column1", type text}, {"Column2", type text}}),
    date = #"Changed Type"[Column2],
    time=#"Changed Type"[Column2],
    datetime=DateTime.FromText(date&" "&time)
in
    datetime

And here is the result with the correct DST and time zone;

2016-05-16_23h08_59

Method 3 Revisited – with Xml.Document

the method mentioned with web query uses Web.Page Power Query function and hence it requires gateway setup to work. Thanks to Yingwei Yang from Microsoft team who suggested this approach; there is another way which doesn’t require gateway setup: using Xml.Document function. Let’s go through that solution.

Timezonedb.com is the website that has an api to return timezone information, fortunately api is free to use. you need to register for the api;

2017-08-25_04h43_22

after registering you will receive an API Key which you can use in a api url as below:

2017-08-25_04h47_49

To learn more about API read this link.

Now that we have an api to work with, we can use Xml.Document function to read data from it. here is how to do it. start with a Blank Query in Power Query, then go to View -> Advanced Editor and replace the whole query with below script:

let 
    Source = Xml.Document(Web.Contents("http://api.timezonedb.com/v2/get-time-zone?key=XYZ&format=xml&by=zone&zone=PDT")),
    Value = Source[Value],
    Value1 = Value[Value]
in
    Value1

This method is the recommended method from all above options.

2017-08-25_05h01_00

Other Methods

At the time of writing this post, I’ve only thought about these three methods. You might have an idea about another method. In that case, don’t hesitate to share it here.

stackoverflow.com

Hi Michael, Thanks for the response. the problem is that suppose I need data grouped by date. Now, the data needs to be grouped by the date in local timezone. i.e. if its 1 am today in GMT, its actually yesterday in EST. I would have to …

cloudbi.com.au

This post shows you how to convert datetime values from UTC to local time. Date/Time – Date/Time/TimeZone. There are 2 datatypes in Power Query that are used for storing date and time values: Date/Time Date/Time/TimeZone; The latter type has the addition of a timezone which shows the difference to UTC time in hours and minutes.

Convert Text to Time Values with Power Query

08-05-2019 · Bottom line: Learn how to use Power Query to convert times stored as text [## hours ## minutes ## seconds] to time values [h:mm:ss] that can be used for calculations and data analysis in Excel. Skill level: Intermediate The Data Cleansing Challenge. This post is the second in a series on solutions to the data cleansing challenge I presented in a previous post.

08-05-2019

Bottom line: Learn how to use Power Query to convert times stored as text [## hours ## minutes ## seconds] to time values [h:mm:ss] that can be used for calculations and data analysis in Excel.

Skill level: Intermediate

The Data Cleansing Challenge

This post is the second in a series on solutions to the data cleansing challenge I presented in a previous post. The challenge is to use any tools in Excel to convert the time/duration stored a text into a numeric value that can be formatted as a time.

Convert Text Values to Time Values in Excel

The original data set contains a column of time/duration text that are in the following format.

1 hour 27 minutes 15 seconds

We need to convert it to a number in Excel with a time format of h:mm:ss that looks like the following.

1:27:15

Power Query Solutions

There were a ton of awesome solutions submitted on the original post and YouTube video. Thanks again if you submitted a solution!

In this post & video we look at a solutions using Power Query. There were quite a few different Power Query submissions. Thanks to Walt, Renato, Kirk, XLarium, Martin, and everyone else for participating!

Convert text to time values with Power Query

In this post and video we look at the solution from Walt. I like this solution because it just uses the buttons/tools in the Power Query Editor ribbon, and does not require us to write custom formulas with M-code.

I believe it's a good demonstration of how easy and useful Power Query can be.

Download the Excel File

Download the example Excel file to follow along.

Excel-2016-File-Icon-16x16-3.pngText To Time Challenge - Power Query Solutions.xlsx (341.4 KB)

The file uses Excel Tables and Power Query. Here are posts to help get you started with these tools:

Video Tutorial

In the video below I walk through how to solve the challenge Power Query. The process is similar to the formula based solution with the text functions. We separate the times based on each component (hour, minute, second), then merge the columns and change the data type.


Watch on YouTube and give it a thumbs up.
YouTube Subscribe Logo Excel Campus

Explanation of the Query Steps

Here is a list of the applied steps in the query:

1. Lowercase the Time column

Power Query Action: Select Time column > Transform tab > Format button > lowercase
*Also available on column right-click menu

Purpose: Converts all text in the column to lowercase. This step is not necessary for this data set. However, Power Query (M Language) is case sensitive and it's a good idea to convert the case if you are not familiar with the data set, and will be using functions that search the text for patterns.

2. Trim text in the Time column

Power Query Action: Select Time column > Transform tab > Format button > Trim
*Also available on column right-click menu

Purpose: Trim any leading or trailing blank spaces from the text. This step is also not necessary for this data set, but a good data cleansing practice/habit since the text length is important in the extraction steps.

3. Extract Hours

Power Query Action: Select Time column > Add Column tab > Extract > Text Before DelimiterDelimiter: hour (

Scan for the delimiter: From the end of the input

Purpose: Add a new column for the numeric values for hours. Find the phrase ” hour” and return any text before it. Using “From the end of the input” excludes rows that do not contain the delimiter because the search is done from right-to-left and does not find the delimiter.

This also handles the issue of the delimiter being both singular (hour) or plural (hours).

4. Extract Minutes

Power Query Action: Select Time column > Add Column tab > Extract > Text Between DelimitersStart delimiter: min (

Scan for the end delimiter: From the start delimiter, toward the start of the input

Purpose: Add a new column for the numeric values for minutes. Find the phrase ” min” and return any text before it and after the preceding space character. Using “From the end of the input” searches right-to-left.

Using “From the start delimiter, toward the start of the input” excludes the delimiter and everything after. This is useful because the delimiter can be both singular (minute) or plural (minutes). Both cases are handled with these settings.

5. Extract Seconds

Repeat step 4 and change the start delimiter to: sec
(

Purpose: Add a new column for the numeric values for seconds.

6. Replace Blanks in the new time columns

Power Query Action: Select 3 new time value columns > Transform tab > Replace Values buttonValue to find: (leave field blank)Replace with: 0

*Also available on column right-click menu

Purpose: Replace the blank cells in the new time columns with zeros. This is required for place holders in the next merge step.

7. Merge the time columns

Power Query Action: Select 3 new time value columns > Transform tab > Merge ColumnsSeparator: ColonNew column name: Time Value

*Also available on column right-click menu

Purpose: Create a text string that Power Query can recognize and convert to a time or duration data type.

8. Change data type to Duration

Power Query Action: Select Time Value column > Transform tab > Data Type > Duration
*Also available on column right-click menu

Purpose: Convert the text in the column to a time or duration data type. Using Duration will change the format in the output table in Excel to d.h:mm:ss. This saves us a step in Excel.

What if the duration greater than 24 hours?

A few questions came up about the time being more than 24 hours. In this case we can still use Power Query, but need to modify the steps.

I included another query in the sample file “Text to Time – >24 Hrs” that handles this scenario. We can use the same principle we saw in the last post with SUMPRODUCT to multiple the time columns by the number of seconds in each component.

Here is the formula for the Custom Column.

(([Hours]*3600) ([Minutes]*60) [Secs])/86400

There are 3,600 seconds in an hour, 60 seconds in a minute, and 86,400 seconds in a day. The result is a decimal number that can be converted to a Duration data type.

Checkout my post on the date system in Excel to learn more about this conversion from decimal number to a time value.

Conclusion

Power Query is an awesome data automation tool that is great for this type of data cleansing. The advantage of using this technique is that we only have to do the setup work once. When we get new data, we can simply refresh the query.

If the data is exported from the system to a CSV or Excel file, then we can setup the query to import the data from one or all files in a folder. Meaning you just have to download the file, move it to a folder, and then refresh the query. Easy as 1, 2, 3. 😉

Checkout my articles on an Overview of Power Query and How to Install Power Query for more details.

Please leave a comment below with any questions or suggestions. Thank you! 🙂

>

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Athena convert timestamp to date

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Us states by region excel

sansepolcro5stelle.it

Pay attention to what output Mar 26, 2019 · Split multi-line value by new-line code in MS Flow. 1342. Jan 30, 2007 · Drop the first * character to match entries that begin with the string access: Like "Access*" This statement would return Access 97 and accessing but not Microsoft Access . Notice that A is underlined on the screen.

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Users can also convert plain english data File to Hex by uploading the file. Backup via private keys. CreateHash Hash. Enter your randomly generated client seed and click on Randomize button. com share the same Time-based One-time Password (TOTP) is a time-based OTP. Net-Next password hashing C# library see https://www.

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21 hours ago · Pyspark: Convert Column from String Type to Timestamp Type; Round time to 5 minute nearest SQL Server; How to access org. Pandas has a reindex() A step-by-step Python code example that shows how to select Pandas DataFrame these can be in datetime (numpy and pandas), timestamp, or string format. 264 67 F. spark. pandas is a Python library for ...