Search results for: Power bi convert utc to local time

Below are our best 38 results for power bi convert utc to local time, updated recently.

community.powerbi.com

You can add time difference manually like below. Last Refresh = DateTime.LocalNow () + #duration (0,10,0,0) Best Regards, Jay. Community Support Team _ Jay. If this post helps, then please consider Accept it as the solution to help the other members find it. View solution in original post. Message 3 of 3.

secure.artpapers.org

Convert Utc Date Format Into Local Time Format In Power Bi The key to mastering any Unix system, especially Linux and Mac OS X, is a thorough knowledge of shell scripting. Scripting is a way to harness and customize the power of any Unix system, and it's an essential skill for any Unix users, including system

powerusers.microsoft.com

Hello @atul-patil ,. If I understand your requirements correctly, there is a solution in this forum: Convert-UTC-to-client-time-zones. You …

reddit.com

I have a dataset with datetime stamps in UTC time. The difference with local time changes depending on time of year because of summer and winter time. This means I can't have add UTC as a column in a time dimension. How do you guys convert them? Does Power Bi have something built in? Or do you create your own conversion formula? I would like to ...

pbiusergroup.com

Unfortunately, this does require a list of time zones and offsets. Calculating "local" time vs utc is difficult once you publish to the cloud, as "local" is server time, not actual local time. I will see if I can get an example working. I have a dataset with UTC times handy.-----Audrey Abbey SR. BI Developer/Analyst

github.com

Power BI Query Functions to convert times from UTC to Local Time - PowerBIConvertUTCtoLocalTime/ConvertDatesFromUTCtoLocal.pbix at master · ryanperrymba ...

How-To: Convert UTC to Your Local Time Zone in Pow ...

16-03-2020 · Chris Webb wrote an article about DST in Power Query where he says: “Frustratingly there doesn’t seem to be a way to convert a UTC time to the correct local time in any given time zone in M – the DateTimeZone.SwitchZone() function just adds/removes hours without taking Daylight Saving Time into account, so it’s not really very useful.”

16-03-2020

Is there a simple way to convert a timestamp in UTC to your local time zone in Power Query? Yes and no. Let’s find out what the options are.

TLDR section

https://github.com/nolockcz/PowerQuery/tree/master/UTC to Local Time However, I personally recommend reading the article once before you use it in your project.

Research

I have started with research on the internet. Maybe there is a solution I can use without spending time on writing my own code. Let’s list some of them – I do not want to call them solutions, a finding is a better word, I think.

Finding No. 1

On forums, you can find a recommendation for using the function DateTime.AddZone. Well, this function just adds an offset to a datetime value. If you live in a country without daylight saving time (DST), it can be your choice.

An example which shifts the datetime by 01:00: DateTime.AddZone(#datetime(2020, 3, 9, 10, 11, 12), 1, 0). The result is of data type datetimezone.

Finding No. 2

Or another recommendation is using a duration like #datetime(2020, 3, 9, 10, 11, 12) #duration(0, 1, 0, 0) which does almost the same as the previous example. The result is of the data type datetime.

Finding No. 3

The most original solution in my opinion is this one ( source )

// Convert "Created" date from UTC to AEST
let createdString = Number.ToText(Date.Year([Created]))
& Text.PadStart(Number.ToText(Date.Month([Created])), 2, "0")
& Text.PadStart(Number.ToText(Date.Day([Created])), 2, "0")
& Text.PadStart(Number.ToText(Time.Hour([Created])), 2, "0"),

createdNum = Number.FromText(createdString),

// AEST time: get the offset depending on whether it's daylight savings time or not (GMT 11 or GMT 10) by looking at the DST change-over times in GMT 0
timeZoneOffsetAEST = if createdNum >= 2017093016 and createdNum < 2018033117 
then "11" 
else 
	if createdNum >= 2018100616 and createdNum < 2019040617
	then "11" 
	else 
        if createdNum >= 2019100516 and createdNum < 2020040417 
	    then "11" 
	    else 
            if createdNum >= 2020100316 and createdNum < 2021040317 
	        then "11" 
	        else "10",

createdInAEST = DateTimeZone.SwitchZone(DateTimeZone.From([Created]),Number.FromText(timeZoneOffsetAEST),0)

in createdInAEST

It is a time bomb! It works for timestamps between March 2017 and September 2021 in Australia. Before and after that the conversion will be wrong! But there is at least an elementary support for DST :smiling_face_with_smiling_eyes:

Finding No. 4

There is another M function, which you can use for the conversion: DateTimeZone.ToLocal. It works in Power BI Desktop because it takes the offset of the time zone from your operating system. But what happens in Power BI Service? The Azure cloud runs using UTC only. It means, a UTC timestamp stays unchanged if you refresh your data in the cloud.

Finding No. 5

Chris Webb wrote an article about DST in Power Query where he says: “Frustratingly there doesn’t seem to be a way to convert a UTC time to the correct local time in any given time zone in M – the DateTimeZone.SwitchZone() function just adds/removes hours without taking Daylight Saving Time into account, so it’s not really very useful.”

A solution

If the good uncle Google does not help, I have to write my own solution. It handles DST and it should work in all countries where the switch between standard and daylight saving time is regular. If you want to know more about different rules around the globe, visit http://www.webexhibits.org/daylightsaving/g.html or https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daylight_saving_time_by_country or another similar website.

The function, I have written, has one parameter of the type any – I want to have just one function which accepts a datetime or a datetimezone timestamp. Later in the function body there is a check if it is one of these datatypes.

(UTCTimestamp as any) as nullable datetime =>

At the beginning, there is a record which defines what your offset during standard and DST is. You should change these offsets if you do not live in 01:00 / 02:00 DST. The record contains also a function called fnDaylightSavingTimePeriod, which calculates the start and the end of DST in your time zone. I have implemented the logic used in the European Union (last Sunday of March, last Sunday of October). If you have another rule set than mine, you have to modify this function too. (Why so complicated with the record? I usually have a record containing a global configuration for a dataset. And the offsets and the function fnDaylightSavingTime are a part of it.)

/*
 * The record defines when the daylight saving time period starts and ends
 * and what the standard and daylight saving time offsets are.
 */
TimeZoneConfiguration = [
    // standard offset
    StandardOffset = #duration(0, 1, 0, 0),            
    // the day light saving time offset
    DaylightSavingTimeOffset = #duration(0, 2, 0, 0),

    /* 
    * Get start and end of daylight saving time.
    * This code implements the rules of EU counties. If it doesn't fill your expectations, 
    * go to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daylight_saving_time_by_country and modify the code below.
    */
    fnDaylightSavingTimePeriod = (
        timestamp as datetime
    ) as record => 
        let
            // the daylight saving time starts on the last Sunday of March at 1am UTC
            LastDayOfMarch = #date(Date.Year(timestamp), 3, 31),
            StartOfDaylightSavingTime = Date.AddDays(LastDayOfMarch, -Date.DayOfWeek(LastDayOfMarch, Day.Sunday)) & #time(1, 0, 0),
            
            // the daylight saving time ends on the last Sunday of October at 1am UTC
            LastDayOfOctober = #date(Date.Year(timestamp), 10, 31),
            EndOfDaylightSavingTime = Date.AddDays(LastDayOfOctober, -Date.DayOfWeek(LastDayOfOctober, Day.Sunday)) & #time(1, 0, 0),
            
            Result = 
                [
                    From = StartOfDaylightSavingTime, 
                    To = EndOfDaylightSavingTime
                ]
        in
            Result
],

The rest of the code is very simple. It checks if your timestamp is in the standard or DST period and add the offset to the timestamp.

// convert UTC to local time defined by an offset
LocalTime = 
    if DateTimeUTC = null then
        null
    else if DateTimeUTC >= DaylightSavingTimePeriod[From] and DateTimeUTC < DaylightSavingTimePeriod[To] then
        DateTimeUTC   TimeZoneConfiguration[DaylightSavingTimeOffset]
    else
        DateTimeUTC   TimeZoneConfiguration[StandardOffset]

And the whole function:

(UTCTimestamp as any) as nullable datetime =>
    let 
        /*
        * The record defines when the daylight saving time period starts and ends
        * and what the standard and daylight saving time offsets are.
        */
        TimeZoneConfiguration = [
            // standard offset
            StandardOffset = #duration(0, 1, 0, 0),            
            // the day light saving time offset
            DaylightSavingTimeOffset = #duration(0, 2, 0, 0),

            /* 
            * Get start and end of daylight saving time.
            * This code implements the rules of EU counties. If it doesn't fill your expectations, 
            * go to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daylight_saving_time_by_country and modify the code below.
            */
            fnDaylightSavingTimePeriod = (
                timestamp as datetime
            ) as record => 
                let
                    // the daylight saving time starts on the last Sunday of March at 1am UTC
                    LastDayOfMarch = #date(Date.Year(timestamp), 3, 31),
                    StartOfDaylightSavingTime = Date.AddDays(LastDayOfMarch, -Date.DayOfWeek(LastDayOfMarch, Day.Sunday)) & #time(1, 0, 0),
                    
                    // the daylight saving time ends on the last Sunday of October at 1am UTC
                    LastDayOfOctober = #date(Date.Year(timestamp), 10, 31),
                    EndOfDaylightSavingTime = Date.AddDays(LastDayOfOctober, -Date.DayOfWeek(LastDayOfOctober, Day.Sunday)) & #time(1, 0, 0),
                    
                    Result = 
                        [
                            From = StartOfDaylightSavingTime, 
                            To = EndOfDaylightSavingTime
                        ]
                in
                    Result
        ],

        DateTimeUTC = 
            if Value.Is(UTCTimestamp, type nullable datetime) then
                UTCTimestamp
            else if Value.Is(UTCTimestamp, type nullable datetimezone) then
                DateTimeZone.RemoveZone(UTCTimestamp)
            else
                error Error.Record(
                    "Invalid data type of parameter UTCTimestamp",
                    null,
                    "Allowed data types are 'datetime' and 'datetimezone'."
                ),

        // get daylight saving time period
        DaylightSavingTimePeriod = TimeZoneConfiguration[fnDaylightSavingTimePeriod](DateTimeUTC),

        // convert UTC to local time defined by an offset
        LocalTime = 
            if DateTimeUTC = null then
                null
            else if DateTimeUTC >= DaylightSavingTimePeriod[From] and DateTimeUTC < DaylightSavingTimePeriod[To] then
                DateTimeUTC   TimeZoneConfiguration[DaylightSavingTimeOffset]
            else
                DateTimeUTC   TimeZoneConfiguration[StandardOffset]
    in
        LocalTime

Next steps

If you think, there is a rule in your country which you are unable to write in M, let me know down in the comments. I will do my best to help you.

Solved: Convert utc to local time zone using Power Query ...

24-06-2016 · Convert utc to local time zone using Power Query ‎06-24-2016 12:41 PM Would i like to convert a column [CreatedOn] Table [Opportunity] found in (UTC + 00: 00) to (UTC + 03: 00) Brazil.

24-06-2016

I had the same problem. It's unfortunate that there's no proper native support for converting between timezones.

This is what i did for a quick and simple converstion of a UTC column to a new AEST column, taking DST into consideration:

  1. Open Query Editor
  2. Add a new column, and specify the m query below. The below will take the "Created" date in UTC, get the GMT offset based on the DST change-over dates in UTC for my region, and then pass that into DateTimeZone.SwitchZone to get the "Created" date in AEST.
  3. Set the data type to Date
// Convert "Created" date from UTC to AEST
let createdString = Number.ToText(Date.Year([Created]))
& Text.PadStart(Number.ToText(Date.Month([Created])), 2, "0")
& Text.PadStart(Number.ToText(Date.Day([Created])), 2, "0")
& Text.PadStart(Number.ToText(Time.Hour([Created])), 2, "0"),

createdNum = Number.FromText(createdString),

// AEST time: get the offset depending on whether it's daylight savings time or not (GMT 11 or GMT 10) by looking at the DST change-over times in GMT 0
timeZoneOffsetAEST = if createdNum >= 2017093016 and createdNum < 2018033117 
then "11" 
else 
	if createdNum >= 2018100616 and createdNum < 2019040617
	then "11" 
	else 
        if createdNum >= 2019100516 and createdNum < 2020040417 
	    then "11" 
	    else 
            if createdNum >= 2020100316 and createdNum < 2021040317 
	        then "11" 
	        else "10",

createdInAEST = DateTimeZone.SwitchZone(DateTimeZone.From([Created]),Number.FromText(timeZoneOffsetAEST),0)

in createdInAEST

There are better solutions where people are importing a table of GMT offsets from excel spreadsheets, or by querying a web service, since powerBI is able to query web. I just needed a quick and simple solution that would work well enough for the next few years, so i just hard coded the DST times (GMT 11) times for the next few years to get the right GMT offset.

Convert UTC to Local Time in Power BI

20-12-2017 · The Problem: Need to Convert UTC. We built an online event management and ticketing system for one of our clients. Events are scheduled and published. Customers purchase tickets online or from agents at the event sites. The date and time of each event are recorded in UTC. Also, the date and time that purchases are made for each event are ...

20-12-2017

Update: Recent updates to the Power BI service need to be reviewed and appropriate updates to the post will be made.

Power BI provides exceptional business analytic services. Additionally, the Power BI component Power Query provides a powerful and dynamic tool for loading and transforming data into Power BI’s data model. However, Power Query lacks a good way to convert a Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) to a local time of your choosing while preserving Daylight Savings Time (DST). Time zone functions do exist. However, one has to be careful how and where they are used. Below I explain the problem with Power Query’s ToLocal() function in the Power BI Service in more detail. I also provide my solution for converting UTC to the Pacific Time Zone.

The Problem: Need to Convert UTC

We built an online event management and ticketing system for one of our clients. Events are scheduled and published. Customers purchase tickets online or from agents at the event sites. The date and time of each event are recorded in UTC. Also, the date and time that purchases are made for each event are recorded in UTC.

The client’s accounting team needs to report on and analyze ticket purchases. The accountants are in US Pacific Time (PT), and all events are held in Pacific Time, so it makes sense to convert UTC to PT. This would be an easy modification except for the time change that takes place twice a year in most of the US and various parts of the world, called Daylight Savings Time (DST).  Under DST, clocks are adjusted ahead one hour in the spring and one hour back in the fall. These clock changes are also known as “Spring forward” and “Fall back.”

A simple PowerQuery expression can transform Coordinated Universal Time to any local time:

DateTimeZone.RemoveZone(
  DateTimeZone.ToLocal(
    DateTime.AddZone([EventStartDateTime], 0)
  )
)

This expression works great as long as users are in Power BI Desktop in Pacific Time. However, as soon as the model is published to the Power BI Service and the data refreshes, the date-times are no longer Pacific Time. ToLocal() converts to the local time of the Power BI servers, which are set for Universal Coordinated Time.

The Solution

To resolve the Daylight Savings Time issue, we need to determine if a date is in DST or not before adding an hour offset. My solution does this with a table of DST periods, including UTC. I created a PowerQuery function to look up a UTC-based value and return 1 if the value occurs in DST and 0 if it does not. I then add that value to the timezone offset.

My table of Daylight Savings Times:

Table of US Daylight Savings Times

The Power Query function:

let
  Source = (DateToCheck) => let
    CountOfRows = if DateToCheck is null
      then 0
    else let Source = DaylightSavings,
      DateToCheckDate = DateTime.From(DateToCheck),
      StartDates = Table.SelectRows(Source, each [DSTStartDateInUTC] <= DateToCheckDate),   EndDates = Table.SelectRows(StartDates, each [DstEndDateInUTC] > DateToCheckDate),
      CountOfRows = Table.RowCount(EndDates)
    in
      CountOfRows
  in
    CountOfRows
in
  Source

The function selects rows from the table where the UTC DateToCheck parameter provided is between a DST Start Date and DST End Date. If the table is configured correctly, at most one row will be returned when a date is in a DST period, and no rows will be returned when the DateToCheck is not within a DST start and end date range.

Note that the date time function parameter, DateToCheck, does not have a type declaration making it of type any. In Power Query, the any type can be null while DateTime is not nullable. As some of the source date-time values are null the any type for the parameter is required.

The value of the function is then used when offsetting UTC to local time. If the original date time is in a DST range, an additional hour will be added to the offset.

The next function makes it easy to adjust our Pacific Time conversion to consider Daylight Savings Time. Our custom column formula now looks like this:

  DateTimeZone.RemoveZone(
    DateTimeZone.SwitchZone(
      DateTime.AddZone([CreationDate], 0),
      -8 + CheckDaylightSavings([CreationDate])
    )
  )

DateTimeZone.SwitchZone() replaces ToLocal(). We pass in -8 hours which is the standard offset of US Pacific Time from UTC. We then call the custom function CheckDaylightSavings() which will move the time one hour forward if the passed in date time is in DST.

Summary

This seems like a lot of work to adjust for Daylight Savings Time, but it is the simplest and most straightforward way I could come up with. This isn’t a perfect solution by any means. Here are some drawbacks:

  • Only daylight savings times for which there is an entry in the Daylight Savings Time table are considered
  • This approach only converts to Pacific Times. Other time zones could easily be supported, but additional work is required to handle a time zone more dynamically if some users are in a different time zone and would like their reports localized.

There are other approaches I’ve seen from implementing an Azure Function to calling a DateTime web service as well as a fairly in depth function with extensive parameterization.

Have a Question?

If you’d like my code, have other approaches, or questions or feedback on this approach, please post a comment.

scaleablesolutions.com

Most of the times while importing date data from different sources the format is in UTC time format. For the accurate reporting and visuals in Power BI dashboards we need to have this in local time format. In this post we will see how you can convert the UTC date data into local time format.

powerusers.microsoft.com

Converting UTC to local time zone ‎06-08-2020 01:43 AM. Hi all, I have a multi level approval flow. The approval emails and the dates from responses/outcome are in UTC. How do I change them to local time? Solved! Go to Solution. Labels: Labels: Automated Flows; Everyone's tags …

Dynamic time zone conversion using Power BI

We will next create two calculated measures – Current time (UTC) and Current time (Local). Current Time (UTC) = UTCNOW () Current Time (Local) = UTCNOW () + [Current Offset] Now we can add a slicer to our report page, and use the “Zone ” dimension. Next, we add two card slicers, one displaying the current time in the UTC time zone, and ...

Have you ever wanted to show your time data in different time zones simultaneously? Or allows users of the same report to display time values in their own time zone? This article outlines one approach for doing so.

If you’ve spent much time building reports for users in more than one time zone, you’ve likely come across a few of the idiosyncrasies of Power BI and date/time values. In fact, if you’ve worked with time zone values in Power Query and you don’t happen to live in the UK) , you’ve likely noticed that your reports show different time based values when they get published to the service. This is because the Power BI service operates in the UTC time zone, and evaluates all locale based time functions in that time zone. Power BI Desktop evaluates them according to the locale of the user.

For that reason, UTC date/time values are paramount. Luckily, most source data is available in UTC format, and it’s up to report designers to convert it as necessary. However, what happens when a single report is meant to serve users in different time zones? Alternatively, what if you want to use a single data model to serve reports in different time zones?

Time calculations can be performed both in Power Query, and in DAX. However, if we want our users to be able to to select their time zone from filters or slicers, we’re going to be restricted to using DAX. We’re also going to need a good source of time zone data. In the end, we need the time offset from UTC so that our time calculations can adjust time accordingly.

One good source of time zone offset is the Time Zone Database. You can register for an API key (its free), and call it directly using Power BI’s web connector. This means that when we refresh our data, we will get up to date offset data when daylight saving time changes, or there are local changes to the time zone rules.

To retrieve the time zone data, connect to it using Get Data in Power BI Desktop, then select the Web connector. If prompted, choose “Anonymous” as the authentication type, and enter the following for the url:

http://api.timezonedb.com/v2.1/list-time-zone?key=XXXXXXXX&format=json 

Where key is the API key that you received when registering at the Time Zone Database.

As of October 2020, Power Query will then convert the resultant JSON data into a simple table. Some of the columns are unnecessary, and we can safely remove status, message, and timestamp. I like to rename the columns into something a little more user friendly. The offset value returned in in seconds. DAX does its date calculations in days, so I create another column with the same value converted to days (the listed value divided by 86,400). It’s also a good idea to rename the query. When complete, your table should look something like below.

At this point, we can select Close and Apply to load the data into the model.

Our report will show the current time for any selected time zone. We therefore need to know which time zone is selected. We will assume that a filter or slicer, or a row filter has been applied, and there is only one currently selected value. We need to use an aggregate function in order to return the offset value, so in this case, we will MAX. We can therefore create a calculated measure to hold the selected offset value:

Current Offset = MAX('Time Zones'[Offset (days)])

Next, we need the current time. DAX has a Now() function that will return this value, but it will be returned in the locale of the user. When it runs on the service, it will return UTC time. We want this to work properly everywhere, so instead of Now() we will use UTCNow() which always returns the current time in UTC. We will next create two calculated measures – Current time (UTC) and Current time (Local).

Current Time (UTC) = UTCNOW()
Current Time (Local) = UTCNOW() + [Current Offset]

Now we can add a slicer to our report page, and use the “Zone ” dimension. Next, we add two card slicers, one displaying the current time in the UTC time zone, and the other will display the current time in the zone selected in the slicer. It’s a good idea to use the slicer’s selection control to “Single select” to prevent multiple zones from being selected. Every slicer selection will update the two “clocks” and the local time should reflect the currently selected time zone.

To see row filters in action, simply open a new page, and add a table that displays the Zone name (and any other relevant dimensions) along with the Current time (Local).

Given that the fact that slicer selections and filter values can be selected by users and persisted, this allows a single report to be used my multiple users in different time zones, but these users can see the data in their own local time zone right in the Power BI service.

Converting UTC to local Time Zone in Power BI

15-10-2020 · // convert UTC to local time defined by an offset LocalTime = if DateTimeUTC = null then null else if DateTimeUTC >= DaylightSavingTimePeriod [From] and DateTimeUTC < DaylightSavingTimePeriod [To] then DateTimeUTC + TimeZoneConfiguration [DaylightSavingTimeOffset] else DateTimeUTC + TimeZoneConfiguration [StandardOffset] 1 Like

15-10-2020

I’m trying to figure out how to convert UTC to my local time in powerbi Ideally through the Query Editor?

Hi @matthew.wright,

You will find details on how to deal with that here in this topic.
Adding a Last Refresh date to your Report

I hope this is helpful
Let me know if you have any questions

Melissa,

Thanks. I looked over this but I am looking to convert dates and time in an existing table to UTC.

Right now these are all in UTC.

image

Okay maybe I didn’t / don’t understand the requirement correctly.

If you have a datetime column and want to change the timezone, you add a Custom Column and implement this logic, where the last number is the number of hours to offset which can be positive or negative.

DateTime.AddZone( [Created_Time], 2)

Melissa,

Ok. So here were my steps.

  • Made new column called Local time

  • Duplicated Created Time Column named it Time Created and converted in change type to local time.

  • Tried to add time wo seconds to Time Created with Custom Column Got An Error. Not sure why. I used the following MCode to dot hat: Time.From (Time.ToText ([Time_Created], “HH:mm”))

Any thoughts?

image

Hi @matthew.wright,

Extracted a small sample, try this.
To extract the time portion I’ve added: DateTime.Time( [Local Time] )

So the full code for the final step is now:
Time.From( Time.ToText( DateTime.Time( [Local Time] ), “HH:mm” ))

let
    Source = Table.FromRows(Json.Document(Binary.Decompress(Binary.FromText("bcrBDcAwCATBViLeQToOWQRasei/jVixn/nO7pzCVIQSxGWj6EVK338en2N5Ho8yK+zfoHiOe3muJN0v", BinaryEncoding.Base64), Compression.Deflate)), let _t = ((type nullable text) meta [Serialized.Text = true]) in type table [Created_Time = _t]),
    ChangeType = Table.TransformColumnTypes(Source,{{"Created_Time", type datetime}}),
    AddLocalTime = Table.AddColumn(ChangeType, "Local Time", each DateTime.AddZone( [Created_Time], -4), type datetimezone),
    AddTimewoSeconds = Table.AddColumn(AddLocalTime, "Time wo Seconds", each Time.From( Time.ToText( DateTime.Time([Local Time]), "HH:mm")), type time)
in
    AddTimewoSeconds 

I hope this is helpful.

Hi @matthew.wright, we’ve noticed that no response has been received from you since the 16th of October. We just want to check if you still need further help with this post? In case there won’t be any activity on it in the next few days, we’ll be tagging this post as Solved. If you have a follow question or concern related to this topic, please remove the Solution tag first by clicking the three dots beside Reply and then untick the checkbox. Thanks!

Hi @matthew.wright, I ask you to see the link below I think it solves your problem or can give you an idea of ​​a resolution.

4fbc51fe46e61b61de777abd44e3b1db31a903aa_2_10x10.png

Is there any way I can change the timezone of the PowerBI Service?   I read that it is effectively set at UTC which would explain why when I use TODAY() and YESTERDAY() DAX in my PBIX reports, they are fine locally, but clearly out of sync when...

Its still giving me problems. I’ll post some sample data. I’m hoping Its something simple I am missing

Thanks for posting your question @matthew.wright. To receive a resolution in a timely manner please make sure that you provide all the necessary details on this thread.

Here is a potential list of additional information to include in this thread; demo pbix file, images of the entire scenario you are dealing with, screenshot of the data model, details of how you want to visualize a result, and any other supporting links and details.

Including all of the above will likely enable a quick solution to your question.

@matthew.wright You can try this . m code in power query .

// convert UTC to local time defined by an offset
LocalTime = 
    if DateTimeUTC = null then
        null
    else if DateTimeUTC >= DaylightSavingTimePeriod[From] and DateTimeUTC < DaylightSavingTimePeriod[To] then
        DateTimeUTC + TimeZoneConfiguration[DaylightSavingTimeOffset]
    else
        DateTimeUTC + TimeZoneConfiguration[StandardOffset]

1 Like

Hi @matthew.wright, we’ve noticed that no response has been received from you since the 21st of October. We just want to check if you still need further help with this post? In case there won’t be any activity on it in the next few days, we’ll be tagging this post as Solved. If you have a follow question or concern related to this topic, please remove the Solution tag first by clicking the three dots beside Reply and then untick the checkbox. Thanks!

Hi @matthew.wright, a response on this post has been tagged as “Solution”. If you have a follow question or concern related to this topic, please remove the Solution tag first by clicking the three dots beside Reply and then untick the check box. Thanks!

cloudbi.com.au

This post shows you how to convert datetime values from UTC to local time. Date/Time – Date/Time/TimeZone. There are 2 datatypes in Power Query that are used for storing date and time values: Date/Time Date/Time/TimeZone; The latter type has the addition of a timezone which shows the difference to UTC time in hours and minutes.

pbiusergroup.com

RE: Converting UTC to Local Time. Create a Measure & do conversion calculation there & place this into card visual. Hi. I added this code to give me a "last refresh" date. This works great on the desktop version but every time I publish …

DateTimeZone functions - PowerQuery M

DateTimeZone. Function. Description. DateTimeZone.FixedLocalNow. Returns a DateTimeZone value set to the current date, time, and timezone offset on the system. DateTimeZone.FixedUtcNow. Returns the current date and time in UTC (the GMT timezone). DateTimeZone.From. Returns a datetimezone value from a value.

  • Article
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These functions create and manipulate datetimezone values.

DateTimeZone

community.dynamics.com

We want to convert this date into our local time zone format. First of all lets rename this column to EstimatedCloseDateUTC. Then go to the “Transform” tab in the ribbon and change its datatype to Date/Time/TimeZone. Next we can use the Add Column transformation to insert new column in the Query. To do this, we can go to the Add Column tab ...

Converting UTC to Local Time

RE: Converting UTC to Local Time. Create a Measure & do conversion calculation there & place this into card visual. Hi. I added this code to give me a "last refresh" date. This works great on the desktop version but every time I publish …

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------------------------------David YeeFoothill PackingSalinas CA------------------------------

Posted Apr 11, 2019 04:38 AM
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Hi,Use DAX to convert it on client side;Create a Measure & do conversion calculation there & place this into card visual.Regards,------------------------------Hasham Bin NiazSr. BI ConsultantKarachi, Pakistan------------------------------
Original Message:Sent: Apr 10, 2019 03:56 PMFrom: David YeeSubject: Converting UTC to Local TimeHi.  I added this code to give me a "last refresh" date.  This works great on the desktop version but every time I publish it goes to Power BI web service which uses UTC.  How can I keep it in my local time?Refresh date code:

let Source = Table.FromRows(Json.Document(Binary.Decompress(Binary.FromText("i44FAA==", BinaryEncoding.Base64), Compression.Deflate)), let _t = ((type text) meta [Serialized.Text = true]) in type table [Column1 = _t]), #"Changed Type" = Table.FromRows({{DateTime.LocalNow()}},{"Last Refresh"}) in

#"Changed Type"

------------------------------David YeeFoothill PackingSalinas CA------------------------------
Posted Apr 11, 2019 10:50 AM
Edited by Ryan Perry Apr 11, 2019 10:52 AM
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Hi David,This is a well known limitation due to the Query engine using the Timezone of the PBI Server. There is no setting to change it.  I've worked with MSFT to come up with a solution, and reportedly they are eventually going to develop a full fledged solution to address this.  In the mean time,  Upon reading your thread, I decided to post my solution on github for the community to view.

https://github.com/ryanperrymba/PowerBIConvertUTCtoLocalTime/blob/master/README.md

We are using in production environment, but be aware of the limitations.  This is offered for educational purposes with no guarantees whatsoever.------------------------------Ryan PerryBusiness Systems AnalystAuric Solar------------------------------
Original Message:Sent: Apr 11, 2019 04:38 AMFrom: Hasham Bin NiazSubject: Converting UTC to Local TimeHi,Use DAX to convert it on client side;Create a Measure & do conversion calculation there & place this into card visual.Regards,------------------------------Hasham Bin NiazSr. BI ConsultantKarachi, PakistanOriginal Message:Sent: Apr 10, 2019 03:56 PMFrom: David YeeSubject: Converting UTC to Local TimeHi.  I added this code to give me a "last refresh" date.  This works great on the desktop version but every time I publish it goes to Power BI web service which uses UTC.  How can I keep it in my local time?Refresh date code:

let Source = Table.FromRows(Json.Document(Binary.Decompress(Binary.FromText("i44FAA==", BinaryEncoding.Base64), Compression.Deflate)), let _t = ((type text) meta [Serialized.Text = true]) in type table [Column1 = _t]), #"Changed Type" = Table.FromRows({{DateTime.LocalNow()}},{"Last Refresh"}) in

#"Changed Type"

------------------------------David YeeFoothill PackingSalinas CA

------------------------------

Posted Apr 15, 2019 05:06 PM
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Hey DavidOnce you publish it to PowerbI service, use Microsoft flow to convert your dates to local time through API access, it is free, easily done and trending as well.sam------------------------------Sam ChatterjeeBusiness Intelligence DeveloperSam Analytiks(M):-( 45) 9163 4228

URL:- https://www.samanalytiks.com

------------------------------
Original Message:Sent: Apr 10, 2019 03:56 PMFrom: David YeeSubject: Converting UTC to Local TimeHi.  I added this code to give me a "last refresh" date.  This works great on the desktop version but every time I publish it goes to Power BI web service which uses UTC.  How can I keep it in my local time?Refresh date code:

let Source = Table.FromRows(Json.Document(Binary.Decompress(Binary.FromText("i44FAA==", BinaryEncoding.Base64), Compression.Deflate)), let _t = ((type text) meta [Serialized.Text = true]) in type table [Column1 = _t]), #"Changed Type" = Table.FromRows({{DateTime.LocalNow()}},{"Last Refresh"}) in

#"Changed Type"

------------------------------David YeeFoothill PackingSalinas CA------------------------------
Posted Apr 16, 2019 06:14 AM
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"last refresh" is meaningless unless you have something in your data that can indicate the last time the data was added/modified.------------------------------Lutz------------------------------
Original Message:Sent: Apr 15, 2019 05:06 PMFrom: Sam ChatterjeeSubject: Converting UTC to Local TimeHey DavidOnce you publish it to PowerbI service, use Microsoft flow to convert your dates to local time through API access, it is free, easily done and trending as well.sam------------------------------Sam ChatterjeeBusiness Intelligence DeveloperSam Analytiks(M):-( 45) 9163 4228

URL:- https://www.samanalytiks.com

Original Message:Sent: Apr 10, 2019 03:56 PMFrom: David YeeSubject: Converting UTC to Local TimeHi.  I added this code to give me a "last refresh" date.  This works great on the desktop version but every time I publish it goes to Power BI web service which uses UTC.  How can I keep it in my local time?Refresh date code:

let Source = Table.FromRows(Json.Document(Binary.Decompress(Binary.FromText("i44FAA==", BinaryEncoding.Base64), Compression.Deflate)), let _t = ((type text) meta [Serialized.Text = true]) in type table [Column1 = _t]), #"Changed Type" = Table.FromRows({{DateTime.LocalNow()}},{"Last Refresh"}) in

#"Changed Type"

------------------------------David YeeFoothill PackingSalinas CA------------------------------
Posted Apr 16, 2019 08:32 AM
Reply Reply Privately
Hello Sam,Can you elaborate a little further on how this would be accomplished?  I was just asked this question yesterday and was unable to provide an answer.------------------------------Kevin JohnstonNorth Richland Hills TX8178748506------------------------------
Original Message:Sent: Apr 15, 2019 05:06 PMFrom: Sam ChatterjeeSubject: Converting UTC to Local TimeHey DavidOnce you publish it to PowerbI service, use Microsoft flow to convert your dates to local time through API access, it is free, easily done and trending as well.sam------------------------------Sam ChatterjeeBusiness Intelligence DeveloperSam Analytiks(M):-( 45) 9163 4228

URL:- https://www.samanalytiks.com

Original Message:Sent: Apr 10, 2019 03:56 PMFrom: David YeeSubject: Converting UTC to Local TimeHi.  I added this code to give me a "last refresh" date.  This works great on the desktop version but every time I publish it goes to Power BI web service which uses UTC.  How can I keep it in my local time?Refresh date code:

let Source = Table.FromRows(Json.Document(Binary.Decompress(Binary.FromText("i44FAA==", BinaryEncoding.Base64), Compression.Deflate)), let _t = ((type text) meta [Serialized.Text = true]) in type table [Column1 = _t]), #"Changed Type" = Table.FromRows({{DateTime.LocalNow()}},{"Last Refresh"}) in

#"Changed Type"

------------------------------David YeeFoothill PackingSalinas CA------------------------------
Posted Apr 16, 2019 10:24 AM
Reply Reply Privately
@Sam Chatterjee, Second that.  What's this about a way to convert UTC dates in a PBI report to a specified Local time via Flow?------------------------------Ryan PerryBusiness Systems AnalystAuric SolarWest Valley City UT(801) 878-3363------------------------------
Original Message:Sent: Apr 16, 2019 08:32 AMFrom: Kevin JohnstonSubject: Converting UTC to Local TimeHello Sam,Can you elaborate a little further on how this would be accomplished?  I was just asked this question yesterday and was unable to provide an answer.------------------------------Kevin JohnstonNorth Richland Hills TX8178748506Original Message:Sent: Apr 15, 2019 05:06 PMFrom: Sam ChatterjeeSubject: Converting UTC to Local TimeHey DavidOnce you publish it to PowerbI service, use Microsoft flow to convert your dates to local time through API access, it is free, easily done and trending as well.sam------------------------------Sam ChatterjeeBusiness Intelligence DeveloperSam Analytiks(M):-( 45) 9163 4228

URL:- https://www.samanalytiks.com

Original Message:Sent: Apr 10, 2019 03:56 PMFrom: David YeeSubject: Converting UTC to Local TimeHi.  I added this code to give me a "last refresh" date.  This works great on the desktop version but every time I publish it goes to Power BI web service which uses UTC.  How can I keep it in my local time?Refresh date code:

let Source = Table.FromRows(Json.Document(Binary.Decompress(Binary.FromText("i44FAA==", BinaryEncoding.Base64), Compression.Deflate)), let _t = ((type text) meta [Serialized.Text = true]) in type table [Column1 = _t]), #"Changed Type" = Table.FromRows({{DateTime.LocalNow()}},{"Last Refresh"}) in

#"Changed Type"

------------------------------David YeeFoothill PackingSalinas CA------------------------------
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thepoweruser.com

Recommended way to convert time zones in Power BI / Power Query. This one requires you to use a specific function, but it’s quite a simple function called DateTimeZone.SwitchZone which, in comparison to the DateTimeZone.ToLocal, only adds a second argument where you can input (as a number) the correct time zone to which you want …

blog.magnetismsolutions.com

This function can be easily adapted to transform a Dynamics 365 UTC Date/Time value to another Time Zone and can be renamed to a name of your choice. This image shows the function interface when used directly within the Power Query Editor. It takes a single UTC Date/Time/Zone parameter; e.g. a UTC Date/Time from Dynamics 365.

In a previous article, I demonstrated several approaches for transforming Dynamics 365 UTC Date/Time values to New Zealand (NZ) Local Date/Time and Date values. In this article I demonstrate the structure of the custom Power BI function referred to in that article. This article demonstrates the internal structure of a custom Power BI function that contains mostly logic rather than a sequence of applied steps.

The function is named DateTimeZoneUTCToDateTimeNZLT. I have adapted this from one provided by Marcel Beug’s DateTimeUTCToLocalWithDST function. My version simplifies the input parameters from eleven to one and includes logic to handle null Date/Time/Zone values. I have also used different internal naming conventions. This function can be easily adapted to transform a Dynamics 365 UTC Date/Time value to another Time Zone and can be renamed to a name of your choice.

This image shows the function interface when used directly within the Power Query Editor. It takes a single UTC Date/Time/Zone parameter; e.g. a UTC Date/Time from Dynamics 365.

This image shows how the function is used within a Transform Columns step in a Power Query. The underscore within the function brackets on the third line represents the current value from the source column; i.e. the createdon column.

This image shows the internal structure of the function. The yellow highlight shows where I have removed several blocks of code so that the structure is more clearly seen. The DateTimeZoneUTCToDateTimeNZLT function encapsulates a FunctionType definition at 1.0, and two internal functions at 2.0, i.e. UTCDateTimeZoneToLocalDateTimeNotNull; and 3.0, i.e. UTCDateTimeZoneToLocalDateTime.

When invoked in Power Query the function is executed from the outer let statement to the inner let statements. There are two inner let statements.

Within the outer let statement, the block of code at 4.0 is executed first. This invokes the UTCDateTimeZoneToLocalDateTime function. When doing so, it applies the FunctionType configuration defined in 1.0.

The block of code at 3.0 is executed next; i.e. the UTCDateTimeZoneToLocalDateTime function which determines if the Date/Time/Zone value is null and either returns null or invokes the internal function named UTCDateTimeZOneToLocalDateTimeNotNull.

The block of code at 2.0 is conditionally executed last; i.e. the UTCDateTimeZOneToLocalDateTimeNotNull function which does the actual work of transforming a non-null UTC Date/Time/Zone value to NZ Local Date/Time value.

The returned value from the custom DateTimeZoneUTCToDateTimeNZLT function is then returned as transformed Date/Time value. A subsequent Power Query step may then be used to transform this to a Date value.

The following images show the steps that were not displayed in the previous image. These steps set variables and perform calculations and comparisons.

It is important to be aware that this logic does not accommodate changes to New Zealand Daylight Saving Time rules prior the last Sunday of September 2017. Since the start of Daylight-Saving Time in New Zealand these rules have changed nine times; i.e. in 1927, 1928, 1929, 1934, 1941, 1946, 1975, 1989 and 2007.

Firstly, there is logic for configuring the Month, Day, Week and Time when Local Daylight Saving starts and ends and the offsets relative to UTC for Local Daylight-Saving Time and Local Standard Time. You can configure these variables to be specific to a different Time Zone, or you can alter the function to include these as parameters.

Secondly, there is logic that calculates the actual Local DST start and end values relative to the UTC Date/Time value being processed.

Finally, there is logic that calculates the UTC equivalent of the Local DST start and end values relative to the UTC Date/Time value being processed. These are then used to determine if the UTC Date/Time value falls within the Local DST period.

In conclusion, this custom function solves the issue discussed in my previous article and demonstrates the structure of a custom function in Power BI where the function consists mostly of logic. This function is easily adapted to another Local Time Zone by changing the code at 2.2.2 and 2.2.3 as described in this article.

github.com

Power BI Power Query M Functions to convert times from UTC to Local Time The purpose of this repositiory is to provide sample code for developers struggling with the different ways in which Power BI Desktop and Power BI handle time zone conversion. Power BI Desktop performs time zone conversion using the user's machine time settings.

radacad.com

Time Zone for Power BI. As I mentioned in detail in this article when you publish a report to the Power BI service, the Power BI server’s date and time is based on UTC, and it might be different from your local timezone; The Power BI service shows the UTC time zone.

Solved: Working with UTC time and converting it

18-07-2019 · Actually, when working date/time values within PowerApps, it would be converted into UTC Time zone value automatically. So when you put a date time value (e.g. Now()) for the start column in your Patch formula, the date/time value would be converted into a UTC time zone value firstly, then pass the converted UTC time zone value into your SQL Table.

18-07-2019

HI @jernejp ,

Based on the issue that you mentioned, I think you have some misunderstanding with the date/time value work mechanism in PowerApps.

Actually, when working date/time values within PowerApps, it would be converted into UTC Time zone value automatically. So when you put a date time value (e.g. Now()) for the start column in your Patch formula, the date/time value would be converted into a UTC time zone value firstly, then pass the converted UTC time zone value into your SQL Table.

Within your Patch formula, it is not necessary to use a DateAdd(...) formula to convert your current time (Now()) into UTC time firstly, the passed date time value would be converted into UTC time automatically, and pass it to your SQL Table.

On your side, please consider modify your formula as below:

Set( Trip; Patch( '[dbo].[trip]'; Defaults('[dbo].[trip]'); { start:; /* <-- Type formula here directly */
            user: User().Email;
        }
    )
)

If you want the start column of your SQL Table ('[dbo].[trip]') to store same date time value as that in your app, please modify above formula as below:

Set( Trip; Patch( '[dbo].[trip]'; Defaults('[dbo].[trip]'); { :; /* <--   */
            user: User().Email;
        }
    )
)

Please consider take a try with above solution, then check if the issue is solved.

Best regards,

Community Support Team _ Kris Dai
If this post helps, then please consider Accept it as the solution to help the other members find it more quickly.

View solution in original post

powerusers.microsoft.com

Convert UTCNow () to local time. 10-30-2020 05:20 AM. I need to add a date time to a report in local UK time based on time now. UTCNow () gives me time now. Convert time zone allows me to convert either to GMT (which happens to be the same as …

devblogs.microsoft.com

Summary: Cloud and Datacenter Management MVP, Thomas Rayner, shows how write a function to convert from UTC to your local time zone.. I have a time that I’d like to convert from UTC to my local time zone. How can I do this? You can write your own function to do this, and use the [System.TimeZoneInfo] .NET class and associated methods to make this conversion easily.

social.msdn.microsoft.com

However, we wish to have Local time in our streaming dashboard in order to satisfy our customer’s needs. For the time being, we are using the DATEADD (Azure Stream Analytics) function to add the missing hours. We wish the solution to be a dynamic conversion between UTC (Coordinated Universal Time) and the user's local time .

powerusers.microsoft.com

I've done what you mentioned on the post for converting from UTC to Central Standard Time Mexico (UTC-6:00) and this is what I get: The output does not contain the hour, just the day. The converted time I get is 00:00 of the day before. I can see this because the next step of the flow is create an event: Message 5 of 9.

Solving DAX Time Zone Issue in Power BI

23-08-2017 · Power BI is a cloud service, and that means Power BI files are hosted somewhere. Some DAX functions such as Date/Time functions work on system date/time on the server their file is hosted on. So If…

23-08-2017

2016-05-16_21h08_11

Power BI is a cloud service, and that means Power BI files are hosted somewhere. Some DAX functions such as Date/Time functions work on system date/time on the server their file is hosted on. So If you use DAX functions such as TODAY() or NOW() you will not get your local date/time, You will fetch server’s date/time. In this blog post I’ll explain methods of solving this issue, so you could use Power BI to resolve your specific time zone’s date and time. If you want to learn more about Power BI read Power BI online book; Power BI from Rookie to Rock Star.

Defining the Problem

Using DAX functions on your local Power BI file is totally different from what you will see in Power BI website especially when date and time functions has been used. The reason is that DAX works with the date and time of the system that hosted the Power BI file. Power BI is a could based service, and that means Power BI files will be hosted on a server somewhere in the world, that might not be on the same time zone as your city is. So as a result when you used functions that works with the current date and time; such as TODAY() or NOW() in DAX you will not get your local current date and time. At this stage there is time zone feature in DAX functions to help resolving this, so I suggest few options to resolve it as below.

Screenshot below shows a Power BI report published on Power BI website, and the result of DAX NOW() function there compared with the local date/time on the client system. Please note that you won’t see this anomaly in Power BI Desktop, because in that case file is running on your local system, and the result would be your local date/time, you will only face this issue when you publish solution to Power BI website.

2016-05-16_20h58_49

Method 1 – DAX Formula Manipulation

One easy way of solving this is to add time offset to the date/time function in DAX. Power BI date/time seems to be GMT. So if I want to show my local time in Auckland, I have to add 12 hours to it. Or for Seattle I have to reduce 7 hours from it.

So I create a new calculation as DAX NZ TIME with this code:

DAX NZ TIME = NOW() (12/24)

and another for DAX Seattle Time with this code:

DAX Seattle TIME = NOW()-(7/24)

Here is corrected result as below;

2016-05-16_21h08_11

This method works but has an issue which I deal with it later on.

Method 2 – Power Query DateTimeZone Functions

Thanks to my friend Ken Puls who mentioned this method to me in PASS BA conference, I come with this second option. Fortunately in Power Query there is set of functions for DateTimeZone. Ken already has a blog post about time zones with Power Query which is a good read and recommended. DateTimeZone functions has options such as fetching local time or switching time zones. For this purpose I can use DateTimeZone.SwitchZone function to switch server’s local time to my time zone’s date and time.

= DateTimeZone.SwitchZone(DateTimeZone.LocalNow(),12,0)

12 is hours, and 0 is minutes for the new time zone. script above will turn the local time zone to NZ time. for turning that into Seattle time I have to set parameters to -7, and 0.

And here is the result set:

2016-05-16_21h49_59

You can also use other functions such as DateTime.AddZone in Power Query to turn the local date time to specific time zone.

Well above solution works like DAX method, but both suffer from similar issue; Day Light Saving Time. This is the reason that if you try code above in summer or winter you might get different result!

Method 3 – Web Query with Power Query

Day Light Saving is a big challenge, because each time zone, city, or country might have different day light saving time. even same city might have different dates for DST (Daylight Saving Time) for different years! Power Query is intelligence enough to help with Time Zone issue, but doesn’t have a directory of all DST times for all time zones. Fortunately Power Query can query web URL. And there are some websites that give you the current date and time for your specific city, country, or time zone. And those websites usually consider DST correctly. One of these websites is TimeAndDate.com . As you see in screenshot below this website gives me the current date and time for most of cities around the world;

2016-05-16_23h16_50

In Power Query we can use functions such as Web.Page() and Web.Contents() to read tables in a web page, and then fetch part of it that we want with some other transformations. I won’t be explaining details of using timeanddate.com URL to fetch the local city here because it would make this post very long. I just refer you to my other post about reading some date/time information for different time zones which is similar to method I’ve used here. If you want to understand how code below works read the post here. For this part I will be using another website which gives me current date and time in Auckland, and here is Power Query code:

let
    Source = Web.Page(Web.Contents("http://localtimes.info/Oceania/New_Zealand/Auckland/")),
    Data1 = Source[Data],
    #"Changed Type" = Table.TransformColumnTypes(Data1,{{"Column1", type text}, {"Column2", type text}}),
    date = #"Changed Type"[Column2],
    time=#"Changed Type"[Column2],
    datetime=DateTime.FromText(date&" "&time)
in
    datetime

And here is the result with the correct DST and time zone;

2016-05-16_23h08_59

Method 3 Revisited – with Xml.Document

the method mentioned with web query uses Web.Page Power Query function and hence it requires gateway setup to work. Thanks to Yingwei Yang from Microsoft team who suggested this approach; there is another way which doesn’t require gateway setup: using Xml.Document function. Let’s go through that solution.

Timezonedb.com is the website that has an api to return timezone information, fortunately api is free to use. you need to register for the api;

2017-08-25_04h43_22

after registering you will receive an API Key which you can use in a api url as below:

2017-08-25_04h47_49

To learn more about API read this link.

Now that we have an api to work with, we can use Xml.Document function to read data from it. here is how to do it. start with a Blank Query in Power Query, then go to View -> Advanced Editor and replace the whole query with below script:

let 
    Source = Xml.Document(Web.Contents("http://api.timezonedb.com/v2/get-time-zone?key=XYZ&format=xml&by=zone&zone=PDT")),
    Value = Source[Value],
    Value1 = Value[Value]
in
    Value1

This method is the recommended method from all above options.

2017-08-25_05h01_00

Other Methods

At the time of writing this post, I’ve only thought about these three methods. You might have an idea about another method. In that case, don’t hesitate to share it here.

Convert Date time from Local Time to UTC time using …

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freelancer.com

I have a POwer BI Table where there is UTC timing I want to convert that to the LOCAL time in another column. Skills: Power BI See more: conversion power point visio, power supply switch time, auto power phone app time android, power bi refresh time zone, power bi time zone settings, power bi convert utc to pst, convert utc to cst in power bi, power bi epoch time, …

dk.freelancer.com

I have a POwer BI Table where there is UTC timing I want to convert that to the LOCAL time in another column. Evner: Power BI Se mere: conversion power point visio, power supply switch time, auto power phone app time android, power bi refresh time zone, power bi time zone settings, power bi convert utc to pst, convert utc to cst in power bi, power bi epoch time, …

Convert Time Zones in Power BI using DAX

28-10-2017 · Convert Time Zones in Power BI using DAX. Even if your SharePoint site’s regional settings are correct (or whichever data source you’re pulling from), Power BI could convert it to the wrong time zone upon import. It’s a quick fix, luckily. Instead of using your “modified,” “created” or other date field in your report, we’ll ...

28-10-2017

timezonecorrection.png

Even if your SharePoint site’s regional settings are correct (or whichever data source you’re pulling from), Power BI could convert it to the wrong time zone upon import. It’s a quick fix, luckily. Instead of using your “modified,” “created” or other date field in your report, we’ll create a new calculated column in Power BI to use with an accurate time zone.

  1. In the Data tab of Power BI, create a new column in your data source (not a new measure)
    newcolumn
  2. Enter the following equation, replacing red text with your unique data:NewColumnName = FORMAT(DataTableName[ColumnName] – TIME(5,0,0), “General Date”)For example:
    LocalTime = FORMAT(Tweets[Created]-TIME(7,0,0),”General Date”)
  3. Then, under the modeling tab in the formatting section, you can format the calculated column to display data in any number of ways. This is how data will show up for tooltips and perhaps the report itself depending on how you’ve set it up.
    dateformats
  4. Update your report to use this new column in place of your original date/time column.

github.com

Power BI Convert UTC to Local Time. Power BI Power Query M Functions to convert times from UTC to Local Time. The purpose of this repositiory is to provide sample code for developers struggling with the different ways in which Power BI Desktop and Power BI handle time zone conversion. Power BI Desktop performs time zone conversion using the ...

fr.freelancer.com

I have a POwer BI Table where there is UTC timing I want to convert that to the LOCAL time in another column. Compétences : Power BI En voir plus : conversion power point visio, power supply switch time, auto power phone app time android, power bi refresh time zone, power bi time zone settings, power bi convert utc to pst, convert utc to cst in power bi, power bi …

tr.freelancer.com

I have a POwer BI Table where there is UTC timing I want to convert that to the LOCAL time in another column. Beceriler: Power BI Daha fazlasını gör: conversion power point visio, power supply switch time, auto power phone app time android, power bi refresh time zone, power bi time zone settings, power bi convert utc to pst, convert utc to cst in power bi, power bi …

linkedin.com

Twice a year, the time zones change. In the spring we move forward, which means it's now four hours behind UTC. Conversely, in the fall we change …